LEARN MORE ABOUT TAKING APTIOM FOR THE TREATMENT OF PARTIAL-ONSET SEIZURES

Your doctor will let you know the amount of APTIOM you should be taking daily. He or she may make small increases to your APTIOM dosing based on your response to it. These increases may continue until you reach your maintenance dose (the regular amount you will take daily). Always be sure to follow your doctor's instructions.

TAKING APTIOM: ONCE A DAY

APTIOM is taken once a day, either on its own or as an add-on medication. It can be taken whole or crushed, with or without food. It’s recommended that you take it at the same time each day.

Aptiom Dose

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS OF APTIOM

It’s always important to ask your doctor about any side effects before starting a new medication. It’s also good to be aware of any changes in your physical, mental, and emotional states and share your experiences with your doctor.

The most common side effects in patients taking APTIOM include:

  • Dizziness
  • Sleepiness
  • Nausea
  • Headache
  • Double vision
  • Vomiting
  • Feeling tired
  • Problems with coordination
  • Blurred vision
  • Shakiness

Always keep your doctor informed of any changes you may be experiencing.

To get help finding resources on epilepsy, visit Sunovion Answers for APTIOM or give us a call at 1-844-4APTIOM (1-844-427-8466). We’re available Monday through Friday, from 8 AM to 8 PM (EST).

APTIOM DRUG INTERACTIONS

APTIOM may interact with other medications you may be taking. Be sure to see the APTIOM Medication Guide, as these highlights do not include all the information needed to use APTIOM safely and effectively.

  • Do not stop taking APTIOM without first talking to your doctor. Stopping APTIOM suddenly can cause serious problems
  • APTIOM may lower the frequency of partial-onset seizures when taken with other medicines. Adding APTIOM requires no adjustment with some anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) you may be taking, including*:
    • levetiracetam
    • lamotrigine
    • valproic acid
    • topiramate
    • gabapentin

    Although APTIOM can be taken with any of these medications, you should always talk to your doctor before doing so
  • Tell your health care provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Do not start or stop other medications without talking to your health care provider
  • APTIOM may interact with carbamazepine and phenytoin and affect how they work. Your doctor may need to adjust your dose if these medications are given together with APTIOM. You may experience additional side effects when APTIOM is taken with carbamazepine
  • APTIOM may interact with simvastatin, also known as Zocor®, and affect how it works. APTIOM may also interact with and affect how rosuvastatin (also known as Crestor®) works. Your doctor may need to adjust your dose of Zocor or Crestor if these medications are given together with APTIOM
  • APTIOM may decrease the effectiveness of birth control medicine. Talk to your doctor about the best birth control method to use
  • See the Medication Guide for more information.

*Individual results may vary.
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INDICATION:

Aptiom® (eslicarbazepine acetate) is a prescription medicine used alone or with other medicines to treat partial‐onset seizures.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION:

Most common adverse reactions: The most common side effects in patients taking APTIOM include dizziness, sleepiness, nausea, headache, double vision, vomiting, feeling tired, problems with coordination, blurred vision, and shakiness.

Pregnancy and lactation: APTIOM may cause your birth control medicine to be less effective. Talk to your health care provider about the best birth control method to use. APTIOM may harm your unborn baby. APTIOM passes into breast milk. Tell your health care provider if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. You and your health care provider will decide if you should take APTIOM. If you become pregnant while taking APTIOM, talk to your health care provider about registering with the North American Antiepileptic Drug (NAAED) Pregnancy Registry. The purpose of this registry is to collect information about the safety of antiepileptic medicine during pregnancy. You can enroll in this registry by calling 1-888-233-2334.

Drug interactions: Tell your health care provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Taking APTIOM with certain other medicines may cause side effects or affect how well they work. Do not start or stop other medicines without talking to your health care provider. Especially tell your health care provider if you take oxcarbazepine, carbamazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, primidone, clobazam, omeprazole, simvastatin, rosuvastatin, or birth control medicine.

Discontinuation: Do not stop taking APTIOM without first talking to your health care provider. Stopping APTIOM suddenly can cause serious problems.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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View the Interactive Medication Guide (in English)

View the Medication Guide PDF (en Español)